Mar challenge - Misty - Chris N

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Chris N
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Mar challenge - Misty - Chris N

Post by Chris N »

I made life difficult for myself this month - I've been trying to learn the Jazz Standard 'Misty' by Errol Garner. It's a great tune with some quite complex harmonies.

There are lots of crazy jazz chords in there - not much hope of playing it on a stradella bass - so it was a mission for me to learn some free bass.

I could do with another month to practice it - then I might be able to play it to time - but too bad - March has nearly run out :D

The octaves come at the end, so feel free to fast forward to about 1:45

Kyle V
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Re: Mar challenge - Misty - Chris N

Post by Kyle V »

Hi Chris Well done! it sounded really good. :)
Ronen from Accordion Love
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Re: Mar challenge - Misty - Chris N

Post by Ronen from Accordion Love »

Wow Chris! When I saw "Misty" in the title I didn't think I'd get to hear you play it. But... wow! So well done!
So with your digital Roland, are you able to convert your Stradella to a free bass system?
What a tough song, but very well done. Extra points :D
Chris N
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Re: Mar challenge - Misty - Chris N

Post by Chris N »

That's right - there are a bunch of different free bass options on the Roland. I am using the c-system layout, which mirrors the layout of the buttons on the treble side. That makes it fairly easy to get the hang of it.

The piano accordion Rolands have the same options available though.

It seems to be mostly classical musicians who play free bass, but it makes a lot of sense for jazz too.

You can do more subtle chord voicings with just one or two notes in the left hand, or jazzy chords like minor 7th, or flat 5 7ths, that can't be done on a Stradella bass.
Also you can arpreggiate the chords - ie. play the notes individually starting from the root until the whole chord is formed. Pianists do that a lot and it gives a nice effect as long as you do it sparingly.

It's more effort to learn, that's the only problem!

Thanks for the feedback.
Chris
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